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Good Morning Fellows - ELECTRIC FAN ?

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  • #46
    Yes. Like this. You can also see where I chose to mount the relay that feeds power to the fan - on a convenient hole on the radiator support.
    Dug up this thread while searching. Keith, I just installed mine as you have. My fan did not kick on. I bought a laser thermometer this morning to check if I have reached 180 degrees (it's only 40 here and I wonder if the probe extending beyond the front of the radiator is giving a low reading). The manual override works.

    Where is your orange wire hooked to and I only see 1 wire on your thermostat? Or am I missing something?

    Thanks in advance.
    '74 w/Overdrive
    Answers to the name Winston
    Far from perfect but still running, we're a good match.

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    • #47
      Assuming your kit has the same color-coding as mine....the orange wire is the main power wire emerging from the relay and feeding the fan motor (via an inline fuse)

      There should be two wires connecting to the thermostat probe, a yellow and a red. Clearly the red was not connected when I took the picture above. (Which I think I posted purely to show where I'd mounted the relay, IIRC)

      I don't believe the fact the probe protrudes thru the fins of the radiator causes it to read low.
      Keith, Huntsville AL, 1971 CC66559U
      10.0:1 CR gasflowed head | Weber DCOEs | CP "150hp" Cam | Good Parts Ram-Air induction | Distibutor by Advanced | Lightened flywheel | Phoenix SS Exhaust System | HVDA 5-Speed | Good Parts R200B Diff and CV axles | Good Parts suspension and anti-roll bars | Willwood Calipers and Vented Rotors | Good Parts Dual Brake Master Cylinder | Konig Rewinds | Boyd 15 gal tank | Miata Seats and Mr Mikes covers | Carl Visser dash | Mohair hood | Gas-strut bonnet and boot lift kits

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      • #48
        Assuming your kit has the same color-coding as mine....the orange wire is the main power wire emerging from the relay and feeding the fan motor (via an inline fuse)

        There should be two wires connecting to the thermostat probe, a yellow and a red. Clearly the red was not connected when I took the picture above. (Which I think I posted purely to show where I'd mounted the relay, IIRC)

        I don't believe the fact the probe protrudes thru the fins of the radiator causes it to read low.
        Thank you sir. I have mine wired the same. I assumed the "missing" wire was just not connected in the pic. . Hope to get in the garage again later today.
        '74 w/Overdrive
        Answers to the name Winston
        Far from perfect but still running, we're a good match.

        Comment


        • #49
          Resurrecting this discussion. The PO had an electric pusher fan installed to supplement the stock fan. I rewired that fan through a relay to a new lighted switch so I'd know if the fan was on or off. I didn't see much discussion about the functional differences between the pusher vs the puller fan setup. Any thoughts on this? Does it matter as far as cooling capacity of one over the other?
          I picked up a Patton fan eliminator kit last year and am contemplating adding a temperature sensor kit to the fan circuit so I can remove the original fan. I like Bobby D's use of a mechanical override for controlling the fan.
          Brian Cunningham
          1973 CF4325U Overdrive has been added
          "Liz's" Plate is: T-AH6

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          • #50
            Puller vs Pusher probably depends more on fan efficiency in forward or reverse. I think some lose a small abount of CFM one way vs the other.

            Some observations/thoughts.

            - I believe most modern cars outfitted run them as pullers.
            - Is that because of efficiency or to keep them mostly out of the elements?
            - The Elements - Pushers are logically more exposed to the elements, wind, rain, dust/debris. Does that reduce their life span?

            I dont know the answer to any of the above and mine is mounted as a pusher, like you.

            My (il)logical reasoning was as below:
            - When Im hot at home, I sit in front of the fan, so it can blow on me. (but that is evaporative cooling)
            - I still want the spirit of original, so I kept the engine mounted fan, and the E-fan is 'hidden' under the shroud.
            - Not concerned with the TR6 being a race car, so eliminating the mechanical fan was of negligble interest to me.
            - I know electrics can fail, so the e-fan with the mechanical fan is belt and suspenders for me.
            - If environmentals kill the fan, then they arent that expensive to replace.

            Mine has been in as a pusher for about 6 years.

            Maybe the OEMs have studied this and scientifically concluded that a puller configuration is best overall considered. ( mileage, durability, engine performance, cost of materials, manufacturing, etc), and DAILY driving....

            YMMV
            Last edited by tr6harris; 06-30-2018, 12:00 PM.
            '74 TR6 CF13007U aka "Mr. T"
            Custom Blue (Delft-Like) and New Tan (Formerly Mallard and New Tan)
            Points, Ballast Bypassed, Bosch Blue Coil, Moss Cobalt Wires, Champion RN12YC plugs.
            Peaks and tweaks, but the spirit of Original
            Redlines always.
            My wife is the Driver, I'm just the Mechanic....

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            • #51
              I believe that a puller configuration is more efficient in theory, but in practice, with a decent fan, either arrangement should work fine. Other considerations would probably carry more weight like, as mentioned, wanting to hide the fan or to retain the mechanical fan for redundancy.

              Ed
              For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by A Brit in Bama View Post
                Yes.

                1) e-fan can provide far more airflow than stock fan when idling. This means more cooling at rest/slow speeds, and therefore a greater defense against overheating
                2) Eliminates the power-loss associated with spinning the stock fan unnecessarily at high speed, when motion of the car thru the air provides sufficient cooling.
                3) controlability. You can fit an override to enable you to turn it on and off as desired. Not absolutely necessary given it is thermostat controlled, but I like it to get ahead of increasing coolant temps when in stop/go traffic in the Southern summer.

                I don't really buy into the rotating mass argument (sorry Bruce). The mass of the stock fan and its extentsion are concentrated too close to the axis of rotation for this to be material. In addition, the weight elimination associated with the removal of the stock fan and extension assembly is pretty much a wash when you consider the mass of the e-fan and its frame and supports you are putting in.

                Best $60 I spent on my car.
                +1 for preventing overheating at idle, the primary motivation for me going with an electric fan.
                1974 Triumph TR6

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                • #53
                  Resurrecting this thread. I've purchased a Hayden model 3690 fan with probe-type automatic controller. Would someone be willing to post some photos of their installed fan and wiring configuration? I'm installing mine as a puller.
                  Pete, Collierville TN
                  1976 CF54385 U
                  A rolling resto in progress...

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                  • #54
                    Some pics of a puller install here:

                    http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-58/TR6-58.html

                    Ed
                    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      About 12 years ago now I followed the Dan Masters play book and installed a Be Cool fan pulling 2150 cfm drawing only 7.9 amps. I did a quick look about and could not find the fan (part#771-19126).

                      But this is what I recommend you consider when doing the fan upgrade:
                      1. Purchase a 16" dia. fan. It covers the width and most of the height of the stock radiator area. See photo #3.
                      2. Get a fan that draws as much CFM while requiring as little of amp draw as you can.
                      3. Some fan motors are taller than others so test fit it before installing. My fan motor was too tall to fit center of the radiator area because when there it hit the crossmeber. So be prepared to place the fan below center of the radiator for the fan motor to fall below the front crossmember. See photo #1.
                      4. Remove the radiator to install the fan carefully. Locate as test fitted. I used sheet metal screws directly into the radiator frame missing the core. See photo #1.
                      5. I placed my therm/switch in a "Tee" in the top radiator hose. Photo #2.

                      The stock radiator and this fan are more than adequately servicing the new 250 HP Supercharged Ecotec engine conversion; twice the HP of the replaced 6 engine. A pleasant surprise. See photo #4. The ECU/ECM/PCM (computer) now controls the fan and I don't have an override switch. My tuppence.

                      Be Cool!
                      Last edited by TRick6; 10-06-2020, 07:51 AM.
                      Best Therapy
                      http://www.britishv8.org/Triumph/AlbertGary.htm
                      Zoom Zoom

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                      Good Morning Fellows - ELECTRIC FAN ?

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