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Anyone Done the Nissan R200B Conversion?

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  • Anyone Done the Nissan R200B Conversion?

    Hi All,

    Considering doing the R200B diff conversion in my TR250 project before I put the body back on. I know Richard Good can supply me with the differential but it might be more cost effective for me to find one locally and just use his install kit....I know I can get my driveshaft shortened locally..

    So, the question is, does anyone know what needs to be modified on the R200B for it to fit in my TR250 if I was to source one locally and not from Goodparts?

    I see Richard has some directions on his website if you want to do the modifications on your own. Anyone done this?


    Cheers,
    Tush
    Last edited by Tush; 01-03-2021, 10:23 PM.
    81 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce, 81 Triumph TR8, 1973 Ford Capri
    73 Triumph TR6 CF4874UO, 68 Triumph TR250 CD5228LO
    62 Triumph TR4 CT6716LO, 60 Triumph TR3A TS69891LO
    60 Triumph TR3A TS64870LO, 59 Triumph TR3A TS44836LO
    https://www.youtube.com/user/cheftush

  • #2
    Yeah Tush, I installed a R200B sourced from Richard Good back in the summer. I had spent months trying to source a suitable diff locally or on CL, but couldn't find exactly what I wanted - which was the 3.358:1 ratio with LSD as used in the 2003-2008 Nissan 350Z with manual transmission (so quite a small donor-pool).

    Besides, when I considered the required machining of the input flange, I did not think there would be appreciable savings over the $600 Richard is charging for a fully-prepared unit of this spec.

    So...my recommendation...get one from Richard and be done with it.

    Either way, you won't be disappointed. It is silky-smooth, quiet, leak-free, totally clunk-free, and has great traction off the line or on damp roads.

    Keith, Huntsville AL, 1971 CC66559U
    10.0:1 CR gasflowed head | Weber DCOEs | CP "150hp" Cam | Good Parts Ram-Air induction | Distibutor by Advanced | Lightened flywheel | Phoenix SS Exhaust System | HVDA 5-Speed | Good Parts R200B Diff and CV axles | Good Parts suspension and anti-roll bars | Willwood Calipers and Vented Rotors | Good Parts Dual Brake Master Cylinder | Konig Rewinds | Boyd 15 gal tank | Miata Seats and Mr Mikes covers | Carl Visser dash | Mohair hood | Gas-strut bonnet and boot lift kits

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm just offering my $.02 here, and my situation involved a custom length driveshaft, but it might make sense to look at the 3102-69 1310 series u-joint
      flange from Powertrain Industries. I used it, and it has the Nissan bolt pattern for my R200. (I do not know if the R200B is the same-check this). Would the 1310 series match
      the existing TR driveshaft? I don't know that either, but the flange was $50, which is cheap. Investigate it and see if it would work.
      Dennis

      Comment


      • #4
        I did an R200 swap a number of years ago and it generally went very smoothly.

        I was lucky enough to find a used unit in a junk yard here in the Chicago area. I then sourced a used driveshaft off ebay and had it shortened at a local shop. What I can't recall is who did the machining work on the input flange of the diff itself. I do know that I removed the input flange and sent it out to...someone...just can't recall who. I want to say it was RichardG but...I'm not certain.

        I also ran into issues where the diff would contact the frame under acceleration. That necessitated pulling the diff out again to make some minor mods to the frame.

        73 TR6
        Libertyville, IL
        My TR6

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks guys for the feedback. Agreed Keith, I’m seeing prices here of about $400 Canadian locally but by the time the machining is done, I’m sure it would be close to the $600. I’ve got a message into Richard to see if he can give me a shipping quote to my US mailbox. Once I get that, I’ll make the decision.

          Cheers,
          Tush
          81 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce, 81 Triumph TR8, 1973 Ford Capri
          73 Triumph TR6 CF4874UO, 68 Triumph TR250 CD5228LO
          62 Triumph TR4 CT6716LO, 60 Triumph TR3A TS69891LO
          60 Triumph TR3A TS64870LO, 59 Triumph TR3A TS44836LO
          https://www.youtube.com/user/cheftush

          Comment


          • #6
            Hey Tush, believe it or not, I actually still have the email thread from back in 2012 when I did the R200 conversion.

            Turns out Rick Patton did the machining on the input flange.
            73 TR6
            Libertyville, IL
            My TR6

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's my install http://tr6.danielsonfamily.org/DiffMain.htm from 13 years ago! Not sure of the differences between the R200 and the R200B. Mine was being mated to a Toyota W58 5 speed so I went with a solid drive shaft per Herman's instructions. Rick Patton did the machine work on the flange for a very reasonable price...... And how are you sneaking across the border to your drop box? Snowmobile? Or helicopter :-)

              And if you're thinking about GP's CVJ's you have flange matching issues to consider..... you might need adapters or not.

              http://tr6.danielsonfamily.org/DiffMain.htm
              1975 Mimosa with a few upgrades/mods:
              Patton TBI
              HVDA Toyota 5 speed
              Goodparts Nissan Diff
              Goodparts CVJs
              AAW Wire Harness
              Miata Seats
              Boyd Welding Custom 15 gallon aluminum gas tank

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Bobby, there are some slight mounting differences between the two versions. Fortunately, I have a US mailbox that has a forwarding service to my Canadian mailbox...it’s usually cheaper than sending it direct. I’ve got Richards hubs mated to the stock sliding axles...so, no cvs. I’d like them, just aren’t in the budget (although neither is the 200B 😉)

                Cheers,
                Tush
                81 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce, 81 Triumph TR8, 1973 Ford Capri
                73 Triumph TR6 CF4874UO, 68 Triumph TR250 CD5228LO
                62 Triumph TR4 CT6716LO, 60 Triumph TR3A TS69891LO
                60 Triumph TR3A TS64870LO, 59 Triumph TR3A TS44836LO
                https://www.youtube.com/user/cheftush

                Comment


                • #9
                  Those who have done this interesting mod: have you noticed much of a difference in the car? I often contemplate going with the Nissan diff, but my oem diff seems fine and my ujoints are new, so I wonder if I would notice any change other than the gearing.
                  SR
                  73 TR6. HT/AC/OD
                  86 930
                  91 535i

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by UberXY View Post
                    Those who have done this interesting mod: have you noticed much of a difference in the car? I often contemplate going with the Nissan diff, but my oem diff seems fine and my ujoints are new, so I wonder if I would notice any change other than the gearing.
                    I noticed a difference right away. I notice that the car tended to remain straight. I have reported this before and have been challenged but, yes, after installation, I could feel the differential clutches (the LSD mechanics) holding the car straight. I could feel my steering the car away from going straight. Now many commented that I could not possibly feel that but another felt the same LSD sensation. So I don't feel nuts. When you get your diff, before you install it try to rotate the axle flanges in opposite directions at the same time. If you can it is not a healthy functioning LSD. That resistance you feel is what I felt on my 1st drive and many subsequent drives. I don't feel it any more but I do notice that at speed my car does not roam but remains pretty much where last pointed. There is a caster factor in play here but trust me, this is a bit more pronounced; similar to the sensation of the spool in my drag racer Vega.

                    When I did my R200 install the summer of 2007, I obtained 2 diffs and had them drop-shipped to Rick who did the preparation. The payment was he got one for his TR6, in use to the present. Both are of the 4.08 flavor. I had since sourced a 3.69 ratio which I thought I was going to use at the time of the supercharged LSJ conversion but changed my mind and offered it to Rick for use in his TVR beast (under development). He insisted on a payment so we settled on $100 and a meet up in Portsmouth NH for delivery. I have a backup R200, 4.08 ratio, all prep'ed, sitting on the garage floor because they don't make them anymore.

                    By the way, while you are there, weld some gussets on the diff hangers because they do fail over time accelerated by spirited driving. Photo 4. And notice the finished diff ready for installation (photo 3) that the axle flange adapter nuts all need to be reversed. Nuts!
                    Last edited by TRick6; 01-05-2021, 12:25 PM.
                    Best Therapy
                    http://www.britishv8.org/Triumph/AlbertGary.htm
                    Zoom Zoom

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by UberXY View Post
                      Those who have done this interesting mod: have you noticed much of a difference in the car? I often contemplate going with the Nissan diff, but my oem diff seems fine and my ujoints are new, so I wonder if I would notice any change other than the gearing.
                      The other thing people claim to notice is that the R200 diffs are much quieter than stock diffs. I can't claim that I notice a difference but many others have said that so I thought it was worth mentioning. The main reason I went the R200 route was that I had 2 stock diffs fail in as many years so I was tired of screwing with diffs. Expectation is that a modern Nissan diff will basically last forever in these cars.
                      73 TR6
                      Libertyville, IL
                      My TR6

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You've probably already seen the thread on my conversion to the R200B from July last year Tush, but if not here it is;

                        https://forums.6-pack.org/the-6-pack...to-nissan-r200

                        I could not find an R200B locally so I ended up buying one with the mods already done by RG.

                        However a fellow member Dave Connitt did do the modifications himself before he installed an R200 in his TR4A. See the "differential and rear axles" section on his website:

                        http://davestr4a.com/

                        Dave let me borrow this transmission jack when I installed my R200B. It made life a lot easier but I suspect that since you don't have your body on frame yet that diff installation won't be much of an issue anyway.
                        https://www.harborfreight.com/450-lb...nsmission+jack
                        1972 TR6, CC75294L
                        W58 5 speed / Eaglegate conversion
                        Goodparts rear hubs, trailing arm brackets and steering rack mounts, Prestige Autowood Hawaiian koa wood dash panel

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TRick6 View Post

                          I noticed a difference right away. I notice that the car tended to remain straight. I have reported this before and have been challenged but, yes, after installation, I could feel the differential clutches (the LSD mechanics) holding the car straight. I could feel my steering the car away from going straight. Now many commented that I could not possibly feel that but another felt the same LSD sensation. So I don't feel nuts. When you get your diff, before you install it try to rotate the axle flanges in opposite directions at the same time. If you can it is not a healthy functioning LSD. That resistance you feel is what I felt on my 1st drive and many subsequent drives. I don't feel it any more but I do notice that at speed my car does not roam but remains pretty much where last pointed. There is a caster factor in play here but trust me, this is a bit more pronounced; similar to the sensation of the spool in my drag racer Vega.

                          When I did my R200 install the summer of 2007, I obtained 2 diffs and had them drop-shipped to Rick who did the preparation. The payment was he got one for his TR6, in use to the present. Both are of the 4.08 flavor. I had since sourced a 3.69 ratio which I thought I was going to use at the time of the supercharged LSJ conversion but changed my mind and offered it to Rick for use in his TVR beast (under development). He insisted on a payment so we settled on $100 and a meet up in Portsmouth NH for delivery. I have a backup R200, 4.08 ratio, all prep'ed, sitting on the garage floor because they don't make them anymore.

                          By the way, while you are there, weld some gussets on the diff hangers because they do fail over time accelerated by spirited driving. Photo 4. And notice the finished diff ready for installation (photo 3) that the axle flange adapter nuts all need to be reversed. Nuts!
                          TRick6 -- I've had my R200 LSD for about 10 years now. Somewhat disappointed to find that the lockup to the weighted tire/wheel is not immediate. (Wheel spin still occurs momentarily when the inside tire is unweighted)
                          I do like the fact that there is no oil drips.

                          Also had to change the routing of the exhaust pipe, but this is a one-time thing.

                          A couple of years ago I picked up a vibration when decelerating that drove me up the wall. I actually had to original diff ready to reinstall when I found, after completely removing the LSD, and saw the two countersink screws had come loose from the bracket. (Shown in photo #3 near the orange lube sticker) I retightened using blue thread locker, which I should've done when first installing! I mentioned this to Richard Good, as a FYI.

                          I'm sure this addition helps the E.T. when auto crossing, if I ever learn how!

                          Dick

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            To be clear, the "B" designation being discussed is something Richard Good came up with, not something that is an official Nissan part code. This is from his website:

                            "Kits are available to fit two variations of the R200 differential. The original kit we have been producing since 1999 fits the “short nose” R200 found in Nissan and Infiniti cars from the 1990’s. We are now also offering a kit to fit Nissan's newer, stronger version of the R200 which we have designated R200B. This version is found in certain Nissan cars from 2003-2018 and is available with or without viscous limited slip."

                            I was especially keen to get one of the "B" diffs, since they are significantly younger than the original Infiniti and Nissan R200s, most of which probably have as many miles on them as the Starship Enterprise. Mine came from an '08 350Z.

                            The mounting kits for the two variants are quite different, but both equally well-engineered.

                            I too used one of those Harbor Freight Transmission jacks, which was invaluable, since the Nissan Diff is heavy - 94lbs wet, vs 78lbs for the stock diff I removed.

                            In use, as previously mentioned it is much quieter and smoother in operation than the stock diff, and given that even my hotted-up engine is likely making 100 lb ft less than the Nissan V6, it is very under stressed. In combination with the CV axles, the drive is smoooth like buttah.
                            Keith, Huntsville AL, 1971 CC66559U
                            10.0:1 CR gasflowed head | Weber DCOEs | CP "150hp" Cam | Good Parts Ram-Air induction | Distibutor by Advanced | Lightened flywheel | Phoenix SS Exhaust System | HVDA 5-Speed | Good Parts R200B Diff and CV axles | Good Parts suspension and anti-roll bars | Willwood Calipers and Vented Rotors | Good Parts Dual Brake Master Cylinder | Konig Rewinds | Boyd 15 gal tank | Miata Seats and Mr Mikes covers | Carl Visser dash | Mohair hood | Gas-strut bonnet and boot lift kits

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              After reading the posts I comment on a few things.
                              1. I used just a normal garage floor jack to install my R200 and the car was on jack stands. It was not too bad. I remember stretching my right leg/foot to pump/raise the diff while balancing the diff on the floor jack.
                              2. I agree with "Bama" that a used R200's, now very scarce, if found may have logged many miles. This aging can diminish the locking, the limiting slip factor of the clutches (friction plates) resulting in a reduction of the limited slip operation. These clutch friction discs do wear. The Edd China video below explains.
                              3. It appears that the R200B does not come in a 4.08 ratio. Many may not see the need for such a low ratio but diff ratio selection is all about mating the diff ratio with the transmission gearing (1st and final gear ratios), the size of tire, the car weight and the type of driving desired.
                              4. As I mentioned, I don't feel the tug on the steering wheel as I change direction as I once did when the LSD was 1st installed. I sense that my friction discs may have worn some by now given the unknown miles when installed plus my abuse.

                              Here is a video which explains LSD (aka posi traction) vs open diff comparing them side by side. I like this one because the demonstrator actually places a torque wrench on the axle to measure the force needed to break the friction plates. He also clearly states that he dose not know the condition of the clutches (friction plates) but just to show the energy needed to break the friction. This energy is what I felt in the steering wheel when changing direction.


                              Here is Edd China servicing a tired LSD in a Mustang. Skip to 3:30. Here he removes the clutch plates, shows them worn and replaces them with new. He also discusses gear ratios differences, starting at 6:00. He makes one misstatement at 6:30. The lower gear (the higher ratio number) does not make the wheels turn faster at RPM; actually it takes more enngine RPM to turn one tire rotation. But the mechanical advantage does allow you to "get from the line really super quickly and ought to be a lot more fun to drive." True! The lower gear moves the car (weight) easier (faster).
                              Last edited by TRick6; 01-07-2021, 09:25 AM.
                              Best Therapy
                              http://www.britishv8.org/Triumph/AlbertGary.htm
                              Zoom Zoom

                              Comment


                              • TRick6
                                TRick6 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                I am not sure how to test for diff clutch plate fatigue or failure. However, I plan to have my spare diff that is on my garage floor rebuilt, installing new clutch plates (friction discs) and then returning the ring and pinion to the operation specifications and install it. Then take the one removed for a rebuild also. Then I will know the conditions. I should have had the clutch package refreshed when Geoff did the fitment alterations on the spare; Rick did the prep on the 1st diff and Geoff prep'ed the 2nd which I have not used yet..
                                Last edited by TRick6; 01-07-2021, 05:02 PM.

                              • frostr6
                                frostr6 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                I was impressed at how easy it seems to be to service that diff, pulling out the gears and changing discs with the housing still in the vehicle. A lot simpler than the TR diff and the case spreader tool.

                              • TRick6
                                TRick6 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                This is interesting. It appears that I could take the ring and spider assembly out, take it apart, replace the discs and put it all back together just as Edd China did in the video. I will probably have to do some research on the specs.

                            Anyone Done the Nissan R200B Conversion?

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