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TR6 passion through the generations; how did you get here?

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  • skootch13
    commented on 's reply
    Al, How did you come to live on a manor farm in England in 1953? That sounds interesting/fascinating.

  • dicta
    replied
    ....and you always knew who was behind you!

    Dick
    Last edited by dicta; 08-07-2020, 04:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    Yeah, I can relate to going from working on bicycles to working on LBCs. For me, it was a 69 MG Midget
    Sounds like the whole family was into TRs.

  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    Ah, one of the original owners crowd - That's awesome.
    I couldn't afford the new version when these cars were made so have been a used car buyer ever since.

  • UberXY
    replied
    My first car after university in 1975. Could hardly afford it, so that’s when I started to learn how to maintain and repair it on my own, which became a lifelong hobby.

    Click image for larger version

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  • bartman
    commented on 's reply
    Ken - Honest, I'm REALLY trying.

  • poolboy
    commented on 's reply
    "I'm trying to swear off the tendency to fix things that aren't broken, and just drive and enjoy.".....Seriously, Bart ?

  • frostr6
    replied
    I've been interested in cars as long as I can remember but my 2 most formative cars were my grandmother's '68 Camaro (for style and speed), and the VW Beetle (for it's weirdness and simplicity). My first car was a '73 Superbeetle, bought in '84, and that was my entry into fixing and improving cars. I generally knew Triumphs existed, but if there were many around northern Illinois in the mid '80s they didn't really register with me. But I've always loved small, unusual cars.

    I got my TR6 through the family: I first drove when my dad had it for a few years and had a blast with it, loved the engine sound. Before him it belonged to his brother in law and before that one of that uncle's nephews on another side of the family, though the dates and info get hazy at that point. The car spent a few years at a cousin's house, and when she said it was free for whoever wanted to fix it, my brother had it trucked out as a project that we did together before he lost interest and now it's solely mine.

    So I guess the TR6 fits neatly into my general car interests and mechanical abilities, and it happened to be a cheaply available car at a time when I was bored with working on bicycles and had a little extra cash for something more interesting. It's been a fun project to build and drive ever since. If I didn't have the TR6 as a fun car, I'd probably have looked for a something like a VW Squareback to tinker with.

    Leave a comment:


  • phil73
    commented on 's reply
    Years later Mr Carr finished the TR4 and started on an Arnolt-Bristol. That car was the most exotic thing I'd ever seen. Not sure where that project ended up as Mr Carr moved away and I went away to college.

  • Elwood
    replied
    My friend came home from school 1 summer with a TR3 that he had bought, with a TR4 engine and transmission. I drove it and loved it. I bought and went through a succession of ****boxes (1 TR3, 2 TR4's) that were really parts cars, and then early in 1974 I came across a beautiful 67 4A solid axle car. Absolutely stunning car, white with seats from a 69 TR6, redline 185 tires, and wire wheels. It was my daily, and I loved it, then decided that I needed a new one before the safety regulations made them go away. I sold the 4A (still miss that car) and on September 20, 1974 I took delivery of CF22767U, Pimento with black interior. I still have it, and I still love it. My son loves it too.

    Leave a comment:


  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    When I was that age, there was a guy across the street, Sid that worked on Kaisers https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaiser_Motors
    I thought they were ugly.... so no interest really there. Now is Sid was instead working on a TR4.....

  • TRick6
    commented on 's reply
    The truth of it is whilst living on a manor farm in Huntingdonshire, England, one day as my sister and I were playing on a single axle farm trailer as a see-saw, I badly twisted an ankle. Whilst I'am in the air with legs hanging off the edge my sister stands to get off. The trailer comes down under my weight pinning and twisting my foot beneath. I felt a warm sensation and nothing else. My mom fearing it broken, recruits a neighbor friend to carry me to hospital. The two of them in front, they packed me in the space behind the passenger seat of a 1948 ish MG. I remember it as green with large narrow spoke wheels. As small as I was then I remember being squished in. Top down, cloudy wintry day. I was in love from there.
    Last edited by TRick6; 07-30-2020, 02:47 PM.

  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    Early car passion turned British at college in California! Love the '3rd childhood' bit - that's one way to stay young
    Interesting point about how Triumph had ironed out some of the kinks by 76.

  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    Another data point for LBC interest in the younger years before you could even drive.

  • dantortorici
    commented on 's reply
    Great idea! I like how that makes a physical connection!

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