Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My TR-6 - save, restore, or send it on down the road?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • My TR-6 - save, restore, or send it on down the road?

    Not sure what path to go down with this TR-6? Had it for 7-8 years, really enjoy it, but it just sits in my side yard (runs fine, little leak in the carburetor)...should I spend the money to have someone restore the entire car?...should I sell it for whatever I can get?...or should I put it in a storage unit and maybe deal with it down the road?
    ...or maybe trade this vehicle and some cash for a "more polished" TR-6?

  • #2
    I'm glad to hear you enjoy the car. Man that's some rust.

    Let's start with the basics. What does "restore the entire car" mean to you?

    Total disassembly, nut and bolt, bare metal, engnine/tranny rebuild and everything new or restored that a shop does for you? If so, that's $75k-$100k.


    Or does "full restoration" mean "Swap out the rusted panels for new. Who cares what the frame looks like (can't be good if the sheet metal is this bad.) And no mechanical work either. Repaint and down the road I go."



    I'd sell it and move on myself.
    1972 Sapphire TR6 #CC84,something

    1973 Harvest Yellow MGB V8

    Comment


    • #3
      I was thinking it's a decent 20-footer that you could just keep driving until I saw the rust blowout in the rear fender and some of the other rust detail pics. There's a lot of good stuff there (the interior looks decent), but the body and possibly the frame will need to be fully stripped and fixed at some point. Putting it in storage will at best delay the problem or at worst let it rot until it's unsafe to drive.

      You didn't mention doing the work yourself, but that may the only way to make this a viable project unless money isn't a limiting factor. Rust repair isn't horrifically expensive until you get to the painting stage, but that's assuming you have the tools, space, and interest in doing that.

      For me, if it's not a project you want to fix, or can't afford to have someone fix, I'd sell it and put the money toward a cleaner example.
      Bill Connell
      1969 TR6 CC28790
      TR6 project log
      St. Paul MN

      Comment


      • #4
        Tough to say.
        • Drive it as is
          • Certainly an option and probably the cheapest option. Sooner or later the rust will get the better of it and then its just a bunch of parts.
          • Somebody named Todd will eventually come by and sweep it onto their trailer for you
        • Minor resto
          • The body work it requires is significant
            • The tub itself has rust, not just the doors and fenders
          • As skootch said, it probably requires frame work as well. '
          • Not sure the word "minor" could apply here.
          • Where to stop?
        • Major resto
          • New frame, new body, rebuild the engine, replace most if not all of the interior
          • 75K seems high but it certainly wouldn't be cheap
          • Only do this if you have some emotional attachment to the car or you want the challenge of restoring a TR6 (which is relatively easy compared to many other cars). Just note buying a restored car would be cheaper than restoring this one
        • Put it in storage
          • To what end?
          • The work the car currently requires won't get any easier, cheaper or less expensive over time
        A large number of years ago I was faced with much the same dilemma except my car didn't even run. I ended up purchasing a new body and frame and doing a full body resto over a number of years. Then over the years I did the interior, the engine, the trans, etc. That was early 90s so I'm not even certain it would still be possible to buy a rust free rolling frame and body anymore (at least not for a reasonable price).

        My car is now a member of the family and I've found the work I've done on it very rewarding and therapeutic but it certainly would have been cheaper in the long run to just buy a finished car in the first place. If you're interested in that journey you can find some of it chronicled in the link in my signature.

        Hope this helps
        73 TR6
        Dundee, IL
        My TR6

        Comment


        • skootch13
          skootch13 commented
          Editing a comment
          Well said Phil

      • #5
        When a shop does all of the work, $100.00 per man hour adds up fast. Real fast.

        https://macysgarage.com/costs.htm

        Look at the second to last paragraph. This is why I asked "what does a total restoration mean to you?"
        1972 Sapphire TR6 #CC84,something

        1973 Harvest Yellow MGB V8

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by skootch13 View Post
          When a shop does all of the work, $100.00 per man hour adds up fast. Real fast.

          https://macysgarage.com/costs.htm

          Look at the second to last paragraph. This is why I asked "what does a total restoration mean to you?"
          That's a really good article, I hadn't seen it before but its spot on.
          73 TR6
          Dundee, IL
          My TR6

          Comment


          • kevina
            kevina commented
            Editing a comment
            Thanks everyone for your input, suggestions, and observations! (WOW!, Phil, as always, continues to be a fountain of advice and guidance!)

            Think I will drive it for another month or two...having new tires and brakes done this week....and then see if anyone will give me $2,500-$3,000 for it. do you think that is a reasonable "ask"?

        • #7
          My 2 cents...$3,000 seems low given prices these days. Someone might buy it just for parts but my bet is that the parts alone are worth a lot more than that. However, Todd (tr250) would know for certain what you should expect to get out of it.

          Even given its condition my bet is that you'll still be sad to see it go.
          73 TR6
          Dundee, IL
          My TR6

          Comment


          • #8
            Kevin, just curious are you the guy who was in the alignment business ?
            Driving a 1973 TR6
            Doing ZS carb repairs
            email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

            Comment


            • #9
              nope....I couldn't align three matchsticks in a straight line! I own newspapers in Bluffton and Hilton Head, SC

              Comment


              • poolboy
                poolboy commented
                Editing a comment
                Thanks, then Kevin.

            • #10
              Doesn’t look horrible. You can pu good used doors reasonably priced rather than installing new door skins.

              thing is are you doing the work or paying. You can still save $$ by sourcing your own parts. If you’re paying someone, I’d just find a better car. You’ll save money in the long run

              where are you?
              So much rust, so little time

              64 TR4 Overdrive Surrey
              68 TR250 Soon to have Overdrive & Surrey
              69 TR6 Overdrive Early with fender beads
              71 TR6 Hardtop Soon to have OD
              81 TR8 Injected Automatic...the LAST Automatic

              Comment


              • kevina
                kevina commented
                Editing a comment
                Bluffton, SC

            • #11
              Unless you really want to weld and repair panels, I’d get the new tires on it and list it for sale now for at least $6k (maybe more). If the phone rings a lot, get yourself a bidding war.

              Take those funds and add $12-$20k. Pick out exactly what you want your TR6 to look like and start the process of finding it.

              It does not sound like you want to embark on a multi-year restoration, but it does sound like you may want to customize some things - diff interior colour, Mini-lites, etc. Those are jobs for a weekend or two and are really rewarding.

              At that price range, you can get a really nice car on BaT. Locally, it will be cheaper still. Unless you really want to do restoration work yourself, you’ll be way ahead money-wise and will have an extra year+ of seat-time. And someone else that’s been itching to restore a TR6 gets to do that too!

              Comment


              • #12
                I say restore it yourself, it will take some time and effort but it will be worth it in the end. Make a few investments in tools especially a mig welder (120v is more than sufficient ) and use shielding gas which does a much better job on sheet metal and teach yourself. My 69 looked great in the pictures before it arrived. I took it for a couple of spins around town and it seemed to run fine. Then one day I decided it was time to see really what shape it was in....I was horrified. The frame had rot, the flanges where the fenders attached where non-existent and that was just the beginning. What started out that Saturday morning as an inspection ended up by that evening as a pile of rubble and a rolling chassis. To say the least it's been quite the learning experience for this do it yourselfer and it hasn't cost me a fortune. It is still a work in progress after several years but it has been driven along the way.

                Comment


                • #13
                  Originally posted by Leebo View Post
                  Unless you really want to weld and repair panels, I’d get the new tires on it and list it for sale now for at least $6k (maybe more). If the phone rings a lot, get yourself a bidding war.

                  Take those funds and add $12-$20k. Pick out exactly what you want your TR6 to look like and start the process of finding it.

                  It does not sound like you want to embark on a multi-year restoration, but it does sound like you may want to customize some things - diff interior colour, Mini-lites, etc. Those are jobs for a weekend or two and are really rewarding.

                  At that price range, you can get a really nice car on BaT. Locally, it will be cheaper still. Unless you really want to do restoration work yourself, you’ll be way ahead money-wise and will have an extra year+ of seat-time. And someone else that’s been itching to restore a TR6 gets to do that too!
                  I like this plan. A new owner might breath new life into it, and then you could find the TR6 that you’re comfortable with too. Win win!
                  1974 TR-6 Logic Overdrive

                  Comment

                  My TR-6 - save, restore, or send it on down the road?

                  Collapse

                  Search

                  Collapse

                  There are no results that meet this criteria.

                  6-Pack Car Club of the Americas Statistics

                  Collapse

                  Topics: 39,679   Posts: 491,630   Members: 40,672   Active Members: 6,199
                  Welcome to our newest member, AlbertDum.

                  Upcoming Events

                  Collapse

                  There are no results that meet this criteria.

                  Working...
                  X