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Rear End overhaul Where to start, what to use 74 TR6

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  • Rear End overhaul Where to start, what to use 74 TR6

    I believe my old lever shocks on my 74 TR6 are shot. Push on the back end and the car bounces like a kiddie ride. Anyway I have been wanting to re bush the rear end and add GoodParts Camber brackets. I'm sure the springs are OEM as well. Where do I start? What do I use? Words of wisdom and experience would be great. Poly bushes? Rubber Bushes, Shock Conversion, or rebuilt Lever shocks? What spring to buy? Any advice is appreciated, Do's and Don'ts. Thanks

  • #2
    Old springs are not necessarily bad springs. Measure them.

    Most of the rest is a matter of taste and opinion.

    Shock conversions are usually change for the sake of change, and don't offer any real benefit.

    Ed
    For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

    Comment


    • #3
      Do you like the height and the way the car sits right now ? If so, don't mess with the springs until you finish the rest of whatever you do..
      Changing the rear springs is fast and easy, so don't be concerned about saving time 'while you're in there' doing other stuff.
      Stick with lever shocks...the REAR suspension was designed for lever shocks.
      Get them rebuilt...
      http://www.nosimport.com/
      Driving a 1973 TR6
      Doing ZS carb repairs
      email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Agree with the above, stick with the levers.
        i used poly bushes when I redid mine. Wanted a little more firmness from the suspension. Plus they last longer than the rubber ones.
        One other thing to check before you start disassembly would be the rear wheel hubs. Once you get the car in the air, grab the tire at 12 and 6 and then again at 9 and 3 and try to rock it in and out. There should be no movement at all, if you sense any movement then it’s time to rebuild or replace the hubs.

        I like your photo, nice to see the TR is still an effective chick magnet.
        ‘70 TR-6

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree with previous recommendations to keep lever shocks. Mounting bolts coming loose has been an issue, easily solved by use of longer bolts extending through the mounting brackets and use of a Nyloc nuts. I consider any original rear hub or hub of unknown history, to be highly suspect and a potential major problem waiting to happen. Eternal check methods, unfortunately, can not evaluate possible axle cracks that are only determined during disassembly. IMHO, having Phil rebuild your hubs will be the best investment possible. All the other stuff planned will be meaningless if you lose a wheel at speed. Just my 2 cents.

          Comment


          • #6

            Click image for larger version  Name:	DSCF1149 (4).JPG Views:	0 Size:	251.7 KB ID:	531501

            Top photo shows the HD rubberized bushings that TRF sells. This is what it should look like when properly installed.

            Click image for larger version  Name:	image_4559.jpg Views:	5 Size:	255.4 KB ID:	531499

            This photo shows the bushing being pressed in with a large socket between the grips of a large red vice.

            Click image for larger version  Name:	image_3995.jpg Views:	5 Size:	238.0 KB ID:	531500

            This photo shows the adjustable camber brackets. Read the instructions & follow them VERY carefully to get everything correct. It's a little tricky.

            Retain the same number of shims behind the brackets in the same position as you found them.

            Also, order new spring pads, top & bottom, both sides.

            Tush has a good video on his website on how to update the Armstrong Lever Shocks, just takes some basic labor, wrench turning, new oil.
            Last edited by SapphireBlue72; 05-03-2020, 04:40 PM.
            Walt
            CC80954U '72 TR6 original condition/sold 16.500.
            poolboy rebuilt the Z-S Carbs. Philstr6 rebuilt both rear hubs.

            Comment


            • #7
              Sounds like you are in rebuild/refresh mode, but what about simply cheching the shock oil?
              '74 TR6 CF13007U aka "Mr. T"
              Custom Blue (Delft-Like) and New Tan (Formerly Mallard and New Tan)
              Points, Ballast Bypassed, Bosch Blue Coil, Moss Cobalt Wires, Champion RN12YC plugs.
              Peaks and tweaks, but the spirit of Original
              Redlines always.
              My wife is the Driver, I'm just the Mechanic....

              Comment


              • #8
                Are the shocks leaking? If not, drain the oil, clean everything including the valve and put back together. May need some rubber bits. Then fill them with 30w Harley fork (mineral) oil and that will stiffen them up nicely. Or you an send them off for a rebuild at Apple or one of the others and to have it done.
                72 Pimento w/overdrive - Lilred
                67 4A Royal Blue - Lilblue

                Comment


                • #9
                  While checking hub condition, be mindful of hub mounts. They were problematic on 2 of 2 TR6s that I have owned. The studs are known to strip out of the TA's. There are good fixes available. Not sure you are planning to pull the differential, but getting a peek at the diff. mounts would be a great idea.
                  Good luck!
                  1975
                  Non-OD

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just a follow up, I put in Goodparts rear mounting brackets, and poly bushes, for the first time my rear wheels track straight, no more negative camber. Yay Richard1

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another vote for keeping the lever shocks. My car came with a tube conversion, and it didn't feel like the rear suspension was actually doing anything until I switched it to levers. I used poly bushes when rebuilding the rear end, not just for longevity, but they're also pretty easy to install. Make sure you use some of the grease made for them, it'll save you a lot of creaks down the road.

                      Other things to do while you're in that far are to grease the splines on the half-shafts and grease the u-joints (if they haven't been done lately).

                      Walt, I've never seen such clean and shiny trialing arms, makes me want to get out a brass wire wheel and clean up mine.
                      Bill Connell
                      1969 TR6 CC28790
                      TR6 project log
                      St. Paul MN

                      Comment


                      • SapphireBlue72
                        SapphireBlue72 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Bill, I wire brushed TA's clean, the shiny is from the silver spray paint (two coats). Mask the black portions and/or touch-up with black liquid paint.

                    • #12
                      I'm just starting back on a long..long time restoration, only had 48k on it when I started the frame up. I'm wondering whether I should have the differential looked into or leave it alone other than changing fluid. If need be is there someone who is the go to on Diff's. Had my hubs gone through by Phil awhile back. So I'm good there.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Kingcat View Post
                        I'm just starting back on a long..long time restoration, only had 48k on it when I started the frame up. I'm wondering whether I should have the differential looked into or leave it alone other than changing fluid. If need be is there someone who is the go to on Diff's. Had my hubs gone through by Phil awhile back. So I'm good there.
                        Leave it. Though you may want to replace the seals on the diff, but you may not know until you drive it?
                        So much rust, so little time

                        64 TR4 Overdrive Surrey
                        68 TR250 Soon to have Overdrive & Surrey
                        69 TR6 Overdrive Early with fender beads
                        71 TR6 Hardtop Soon to have OD
                        81 TR8 Injected Automatic...the LAST Automatic

                        Comment


                        • Kingcat
                          Kingcat commented
                          Editing a comment
                          I'm going to take the group advice to basically leave it alone except for cleaning and refill. I will look at the seals too.

                      • #14
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF1101.JPG
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ID:	542513Remove the back plate and see if the gears look this good.

                        TRF always recommended two of the paper gaskets upon resealing, along with some red Permatex on both sides.

                        The back plate can (potentially) go on in two ways- but only one is correct.
                        Walt
                        CC80954U '72 TR6 original condition/sold 16.500.
                        poolboy rebuilt the Z-S Carbs. Philstr6 rebuilt both rear hubs.

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          I'd want to open it to at least inspect and clean it. Unless it's been modified the diff doesn't have an oil drain, just a fill. The diff on mine was all sludged up inside, I felt much better knowing it was clean and had fresh oil.
                          Bill Connell
                          1969 TR6 CC28790
                          TR6 project log
                          St. Paul MN

                          Comment


                          • Kingcat
                            Kingcat commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Good suggestion. I think I'll clean and inspect. Being a novice. I hope I can spot obvious wear if there is any. What should I fill it with. Is there a synthetic? Or go with what the specs call for?
                            Last edited by Kingcat; 07-01-2021, 10:43 PM.

                          • frostr6
                            frostr6 commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I'm no expert on oils, but I think there are both conventional and synthetics that'll work, the main thing is that it doesn't attack the yellow metal in the thrust washers. GL4 gear oil should meet this, and some GL5 oils do, there are a ton of threads on different message boards about it.

                            The other thing to look for while you're give it a once-over is to make sure the vent hole at the top of the case is clear. If that's plugged up you're bound to blow oil past the seals when it heats up.

                          • Kingcat
                            Kingcat commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I was wondering what I should use to clean it out? I imagine something that cleans well but doesn't leave a residue.

                        Rear End overhaul Where to start, what to use 74 TR6

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