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  • Brake servo refurbish

    While waiting for access to a paint booth I have been fooling around with minor things like installing choke cables on my new carbs and prepping the convertible top frame. I drove the shell up and down the street a couple of times and noticed that the brake pedal would not return all the way back unless I put my foot under it and lifted it back. Thinking it was the the non return valve I replaced it and that seemed to solve the problem. Yesterday I started the car and after hitting the brakes the pedal did not return. I checked for vacuum leaks and found none. After checking online for replacements I decided to look at the efforts of several our members and with their unknowing assistance I took it apart today. 4 Hours start to finish. Not an easy job, only made possible by the helpful posts found here and elsewhere. The hardest part was opening the can and then, putting it back together. To open it I bolted a section of Kindorf to the MC studs and anchored that in my vise. I used another 4' piece of Kindorf on 2 of the pedal side studs and tried to turn it with zero success. Afraid I was going to damage something beyond repair I tried 2 things that I had not seen elsewhere. I sprayed PB Blaster on the join then I took a linemans pliers and flexed the edge of the can at the join back and forth a little. I did this all around the circumference. Not enough to deform it just a wiggle back and forth. Next I took a blunt air chisel and ran it lightly around the seam a couple of times. I put the kindorf back on and it eased open without any damage. Inside there was a good amount of rust but the rubber parts were fine. Believe it or not, another major problem was getting the key out that secures that valve stem. It had a lot of rust on it and would not slide out. It took almost 2 hours of solvent and teasing with a pick and tiny screw driver to get it out. The internal piston was filthy as was the bore it was in.I cleaned everything, greased all of the seals and with the help of a friend got the 2 cans mated and sealed. With the car running the pedal feel is much better and now returns normally. As others have mentioned I believe that the cabin side filter was responsible for the coating of gunk found in the piston bore and coating the seals. My thanks to all who posted info on the subject!

    Anthony
    1976 TR6 originally white now Porsche Voodoo Blue
    Frame off resto started May 2015
    Tshirts and TA boxes replaced
    Diff braced and reinforced
    Engine and head rebuilt
    Header and Intake ported
    SS exhaust
    Floors repaired, new metal at rear bumper mounting points
    New Rockers
    AAW wiring - GM alternator
    Complete suspension and brake rebuild, poly bushings

  • #2
    Thanks for the write up. Any photos of this job?
    1974 TR-6 Logic Overdrive

    Comment


    • #3
      This is what I found inside. The wet look comes from the solvent I sprayed on everything to dissolve the rust and gunk that coated some parts and you can see where moisture sat for almost 40 years. I ended up soaking the rubber bellows thing in a combination of PB Blaster and Purple Power to soften the rust and then carefully massaged the rubber to break up the thicker rust deposits. I didn't plan for any real documenting because I was in a hurry and others had already done a better job than I could.
      1976 TR6 originally white now Porsche Voodoo Blue
      Frame off resto started May 2015
      Tshirts and TA boxes replaced
      Diff braced and reinforced
      Engine and head rebuilt
      Header and Intake ported
      SS exhaust
      Floors repaired, new metal at rear bumper mounting points
      New Rockers
      AAW wiring - GM alternator
      Complete suspension and brake rebuild, poly bushings

      Comment


      • #4
        Here are a couple of pics of the cleaned up piston assembly that I found. The key had a ton of rust on it, front and back.
        1976 TR6 originally white now Porsche Voodoo Blue
        Frame off resto started May 2015
        Tshirts and TA boxes replaced
        Diff braced and reinforced
        Engine and head rebuilt
        Header and Intake ported
        SS exhaust
        Floors repaired, new metal at rear bumper mounting points
        New Rockers
        AAW wiring - GM alternator
        Complete suspension and brake rebuild, poly bushings

        Comment


        • #5
          Not a lot of guys have attempted to get into those Anthony so kudos to you.

          Cheers
          Tush
          81 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce, 81 Triumph TR8
          73 Triumph TR6 CF4874UO, 68 Triumph TR250 CD5228LO
          62 Triumph TR4 CT6716LO, 60 Triumph TR3A TS69891LO
          60 Triumph TR3A TS64870LO, 59 Triumph TR3A TS44836LO
          https://www.youtube.com/user/cheftush

          Comment


          • #6
            I will second those kudo's - great job! Took the booster off mine over 20 years ago, dripping with brake fluid, and couldn't get it apart so sent it off. But always wondered like the insides looked like.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes thanks for the post and photos too!
              1974 TR-6 Logic Overdrive

              Comment


              • #8
                Good job Anthony, do you have a picture of the “cabin side air filter” you refer to? I don’t recall seeing that when I took mine off.
                I72 Pimento w/overdrive

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                • #9
                  The cabin air filter was supposed to be some type of foam material that was put in place inside the the tube that located the pedal plunger and piston. If you pull off the rubber boot inside the car you will see that there is considerable space around the pedal push rod. The filter would have filled this space. From what I have read they basically dissolved over time and the material migrated into the servo contributing to the oily material that I found gumming up the internal seals. I made a filter from a piece of foam. I think Ed H has better pics than I do on his Bullfire site. There is also a lot of info and pics on the Buckeye Triumph site. Hope that will help.

                  Anthony
                  1976 TR6 originally white now Porsche Voodoo Blue
                  Frame off resto started May 2015
                  Tshirts and TA boxes replaced
                  Diff braced and reinforced
                  Engine and head rebuilt
                  Header and Intake ported
                  SS exhaust
                  Floors repaired, new metal at rear bumper mounting points
                  New Rockers
                  AAW wiring - GM alternator
                  Complete suspension and brake rebuild, poly bushings

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you hear a whistling when you depress the brake pedal, it might be air passing thru that filter...seems like the air passing thru everytime you brake dries that thing out. Anyway, I finally silenced the whistle I was hearing with a few shots of WD 40 into the boot.
                    Last edited by poolboy; 02-09-2020, 02:11 PM.
                    Driving a 1973 TR6
                    Doing ZS carb repairs
                    email kencorsaw"at"aol.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by poolboy View Post
                      I finally silenced the whistle I was hearing with a few shots of WD 40 into the boot.
                      I'll try that after my next batch of hot chilli! Nyuk nyuk

                      Comment

                      Brake servo refurbish

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